Where Does Yogurt Come From?

If your daily habit is to eat a yogurt (or half a bucket) then you should know that you are on the road to happiness, long life and maybe prosperity. Those cute guys in white lab coats have spent a lot of time studying the influence of yogurt on one’s body and the results have been very interesting.

The regular consumption of yogurt can show health benefits in the case of gastrointestinal conditions, constipation, colon cancer, inflammatory bowel disease or allergies. The study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition also emphasizes the fact that the yogurt contains high levels of vitamin B, lactose, proteins, lipids and minerals. Bottom line: it’s good for your health!

When did it all start?

Photo source: joefitness.com
Photo source: joefitness.com

Although there are many versions of the story, all of them agree that the word “yoğurt” (to be curdled or coagulated; to thicken) has Turkish origins and that it was discovered by accident.

Lots of historians believe that the yogurt came from the Neolithic peoples in Central Asia around 6000 B.C. In fact many records say that Genghis Khan, the one who founded the Mongol Empire used yogurt as the basis of his diet.

How was it made?

In the beginning, the milk was transformed into yogurt by storing it in sheep/goat-skin bags and drying it in the sun. When it came in contact with the bacteria existent in the skin, the milk would instantly ferment and the result would be the yogurt.

How is it done now?

Nowadays, yogurt is done through pasteurization. This means that the milk is heated to 43 degrees Celsius and it is enriched with two kinds of bacteria: Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus. The fruit jam or fruit yogurt was introduced on the market in the 1930s giving people some extra flavor in their daily life.

What about the Greek yogurt?

Photo source: video.foxnews.com
Photo source: video.foxnews.com

I recently had a discussion with someone who was trying to convince me that the Greek yogurt was pure sour cream and that its high quantity of fats was going to pump up the cholesterol in my body faster than I could say “yogurt.” Given that I am completely crazy about this type of yogurt, I decided to do some research. And the Gods have spoken. They told me that the Greek yogurt, with its creamy texture is in fact filled with calcium, potassium, zinc and vitamins B6 and B12. In addition to this, it has lower quantities of lactose, probiotic cultures and a double quantity of protein content. It is precisely this quantity of protein that will keep one’s stomach full for a longer period of time.

What do you think about the habit of eating yogurt every day? Do you do it? Would you recommend it?

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