Travel

Tips for exploring Oahu on a budget

Is your daydream of breezy Polynesian afternoons with Mai Tai sipping more than 2,000 miles from home in almost bare spare time – just that?

Have you ever sat in your living room bathed in sweat? Hawaii 5-0 just to look out at brown and gray skeletons of the wilderness and catch the surf on the infamous north coast?

Rumors abound: Hawaii is expensive. Indeed, The Gathering Place comes at a high cost. But there are a few sneaky ways to keep your costs down. Oahu on a budget is possible.

If Oahu is on your bucket list, here are some tips to help cut spending, even on a proletarian budget.

Oahu on a budgetOahu on a budget

Oahu on a budget

Here are some tips and tricks for exploring Oahu on a budget.

Don’t come in the summer

Oahu’s weather is pleasant all year round. With countless days of sunshine and average temperatures between 76 and 84 degrees from January to December, why wait until summer to visit? Round-trip flights from September to February cost between $ 450 and $ 800 on the west coast of the US and between $ 550 and $ 930 on the east coast of the US. From March until summer, prices double and triple.

Check Kayak.com or expedia.com for the summary of travel search engines and a flexible search format that allows you to search for the best prices for up to a year. Keep in mind that prices for vacation trips and surfers looking to catch the 25 to 30 foot winter waves on the north coast will be higher in December.

Consider renting a vacation home / apartment

Paradise leisure doesn’t have to break the bank. Hotels range from $ 145 to $ 750 per night, from basic accommodations to luxury amenities. However, many people rent their condos, houses, and timeshares for more nominal fees. The result is pleasant amenities like private patios, on-site laundry facilities, and well-functioning kitchens.

Many expect the buzz of designer shops, restaurants, and street beaches in Waikiki. For those looking to get away from the saturated tourism, Kailua Beach, Hawaii Kai, and Haleiwa (North Shore) offer local vibes and world-famous attractions.

If you look at the Oahu m, places east of Honolulu are more popular. You could also enjoy the leeward (west) side of the island, but places north of Ko Olina and west of Haleiwa are isolated.

Airbnb is the best place to find affordable vacation rentals in Oahu. Look below:

Rent a car or moped and do your own thing

Depending on the time of year, an economy or small car costs just over $ 200 per week. It will buy you sweet devotion too. You then have the flexibility to stick to your schedule, stay somewhere other than Waikiki, get groceries for your kitchen and dine where the locals do, seek island adventures, island contrasting beaches, and freedom having to suck prone wallet-prone facilities (and mostly sunburned) tourists. However, always give yourself more time and money parking, which is a commodity depending on the destination.

Expedia or kayak are great places to book your bikes. Unless you plan on being far from where you are staying and you don’t mind rocking the unsexy Pokeman ball head look, consider renting a moped.

It is also important to explore the beaches in the area where you plan to stay. Some beaches like Sandy Beach, Waimea, and Pipeline are not safe for amateur or small swimmers, especially during the winter months.

Eat Like a Local!

There’s a general rule of thumb when it comes to food in Hawaii: it’s only expensive if you try to eat the way you eat on the mainland, where cows, chickens, and farms are readily available.

Come to Hawaii with an open mind to the fusion of island and Asian cuisine. Most Hawaiian dishes consist of at least one meat, two scoops of rice (usually white), and one scoop of macaroni salad.

There are many types of fish and sack to eat, some of the freshest tastes you will ever find! Fish, fried meat, and starch are abundant and eat them. The north coast supplies scattered varieties of food trucks for inclusion. All over the island there are tiny ugly Hawaiian barbecues, bento counters, and sushi houses with Ono island vittles waiting to be consumed rather than on the bottom of your wallet.

Try something new! Consult StreetGrindz A list of local food events can be found across the island. Here is an opportunity that will turn your inner foodie into a hula.

Must eat on the Che in Oahu

Looking for Che Food in Oahu? Here’s where to go:

If you’re still craving familiarities like milk, eggs, and potatoes, some mainland chains are spread across the island, costing an average of $ 2.30 to $ 4.80 more per meal.

Che A ** Activities in Oahu on Budget

When doing Oahu on a budget, you need to find the best things that you can do. Here are some options to keep you occupied while staying within your travel budget.

Ko Olina lagoons

These man-made lagoons are the perfect spot for families with young children looking for calm waters at Disney’s Aulani Resort. Parking and access are free, but wait at least 15 minutes for the space available. Resort quality, bathhouse, grass, outdoor showers. No personal umbrellas or tents allowed.

Nu’uanu Pali viewpoint

If you want to see what makes Hawaii art different from other tropical destinations, please find it here. $ 3.00 and you’ll experience one of the most breathtaking scenes on the island with views of the entire windward side and the commanding Ko’olau mountain range plunging into the Pacific. Oh, and wild chickens in the parking lot.

Historic Chinatown

For stories and insights into an influential part of Oahu, head to Chinatown. Adventure is the word of the day as you squeeze, slide, and announce eye contact while wondering where the dim sum that the aniseed urine smell from Dingy-Fish-Star comes from. Herbal medicine, lei shops and the island’s best D *** product markets are here.

Interesting varieties, people watching and seemingly endless supplies of bubble drinks. Walk past the old Wo Fat building where the Hawaii 5-0 Character is named.

Shop for the trendy and che, che, che clothes and hot tees that will question their stamina to stay on your body for more than one wear.

Visit the Hawaii Heritage Center on Smith Street and, for $ 1, learn how the Asian families risked their lives and family relationships to farm the plantations, the two fires that nearly wiped out the area and the Bubonic plague that caused it. Browse the markets and buy dragon fruit and rambutan. Here you experience the unknown. Then go back to your room and scrub your feet with bleach.

Honu watching at Turtle Beach

Turtle Beach on the north coast is a nice place to sit on large, onyx-colored, pointed rocks and watch the turtles or “honu”. As one of the best sunset spots on the island and in summer, turtles come to the sand to lay their eggs. Easy access to the beach with free parking.

Turtle Beach in OahuWatch the turtles or “honu” on Turtle Beach in Oahu

Souvenir shopping at the International Marketplace and at Aloha Stadium Sw

Both show the best sorts and Che souvenirs. Done right, either location can easily stock up on souvenirs for $ 30 or less. Remember to negotiate prices easily (too low is just an insult) and not let anyone charge you over $ 4.00 for a sandwich bag of pine or sugar cane.

  • International Marketplace Pros: great finds, nice area in the heart of Waikiki, shady, close to shops

disadvantage: In the heart of Waikiki, parking is expensive and almost ridiculous

  • Aloha Stadium Sw professionals: Great finds, great variety, flea market finds, very affordable prices, $ 1 entry includes parking, parking is easy to find

disadvantage: Lack of shade, besides shaved ice – limited concessions, blazing sun rubbing your face

Byodo-In Temple

The Halcyon Temple stands in the foreground of the impressive Ko’olau Mountain. Admission is $ 3 per adult, $ 2 for seniors, and $ 1 per child. On Hawaii 5-0, Magnum PI and the ABC series, Lost.

Additional tips for experiencing Oahu on a budget

  • Pack sunscreen. Otherwise, you could end up paying up to $ 28 for a regular Waikiki subway … or in serious pain.
  • Bring or purchase your own snorkeling gear
  • Pack sunglasses
  • Carry cash with you. Many places outside Waikiki don’t accept credit cards.

See? Your mai tai coconut bra wearing lau dance fantasies in Oahu can be your reality.

With serious planning, even the greatest of haoles can take advantage of an adventure of a lifetime. Take out your pencil and scrape, shop for an ugly floral shirt, and pack a fishing cart size sun visor. Just think, you will refer to everyone as a “brah” and be shaking your ocole to the ukulele in no time.

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